Oh my godddddd. Help me, the crazy puppet guy that works across the hall from me is now working in my office due to construction.

He has brought his puppets. He is concerned about them and how they may inhale construction dust and is asking for masks for them.

Christ, my job is ridiculous.

Rupert, the new baby at our zoo.

Rupert, the new baby at our zoo.

I was looking for one of my favorite books from when I was younger and I remembered a conversation that I had with Katie once. 

We were reading Fire Bringer which was my favorite book as a child, hands down. We were about a chapter in and Katie looked at me and said this.

"You do realize this book is about World War II but with deer, right?"

So my future was definitely determined for me. 

renamonkalou:

Angawi house, Jeddah, Arabia Saudita

marthajefferson:

ragsmartinjones:

Embroidered silk satin evening shoes by Roger Vivier for Christian Dior, c. 1958

marthajefferson:

ragsmartinjones:

Embroidered silk satin evening shoes by Roger Vivier for Christian Dior, c. 1958

Marching into the battlefield - Firearms

Where a goat can go, a man can go. And where a man can go, he can drag a gun.
marthajefferson:

yama-bato:

China, Wan Li period (1573–1620), Mounts England, c. 1600 Kendi pouring vessel adapted as a ewer with English silver mounts
This ewer belongs to a group of porcelain objects that were made during the reign of Emperor Wan Li and exported to Europe. The term kendi derives from Sanskrit and denotes drinking vessels with squat, spherical bodies, a trumpet-shaped neck and a spout. In order to be able to use the kendi as a pouring vessel according to Western custom it was mounted in silver. The zoomorphic design of the root of the spout resembles a wolf’s head. Other heads representing animals and mythical creatures are found on the upper part of the handle which is attached to the neck by a band. The domed cover has a narrow base and displays a winged cherub’s head towards the handle.

marthajefferson:

yama-bato:

China, Wan Li period (1573–1620), Mounts England, c. 1600

Kendi pouring vessel adapted as a ewer with English silver mounts

This ewer belongs to a group of porcelain objects that were made during the reign of Emperor Wan Li and exported to Europe. The term kendi derives from Sanskrit and denotes drinking vessels with squat, spherical bodies, a trumpet-shaped neck and a spout. In order to be able to use the kendi as a pouring vessel according to Western custom it was mounted in silver. The zoomorphic design of the root of the spout resembles a wolf’s head. Other heads representing animals and mythical creatures are found on the upper part of the handle which is attached to the neck by a band. The domed cover has a narrow base and displays a winged cherub’s head towards the handle.

If any of you are on Flight Rising, I just joined this morning! EEEE My username is spitfire007!

Let me know your usernames so we can be friends!!!

tagged → #flight rising